One more book and Report, part II


Prairie WillowThe Buffalo StormI have to say that when I saw this book I immediately thought it was a living book. I wasn’t mistaken. It has the prairie theme, and there are a few words in it I didn’t even know the meaning (boulder:: a detached and rounded or worn rock, esp. a large one, lurch: An abrupt rolling or pitching., rile: to irritate or vex.). The language is poetic, the story a jewel. When I was young in the mountains from the Five in a Row curriculum came to our mind, and Prairie Willow too. The illustrations seem to be done with pastel paint, the technique employed conveys movement, the air filled with dirt, and it captures that earthy and rustic landscape . A combination of realism and impressionism in my opinion. Now my oldest is painting the last scene of the book, and she told me, “mom, this is a cabin like the Stephen F. Austin cabin” (and it’s from that period, made of logs, from the first settlers in our prairie terrains). My days are lit when I see them loving art, making connections and motivated from within to work, weather Saturday or Monday, they love working.

REPORT, PART II. (smile)
The Original McGuffeys Eclectic First ReaderAfter reading some blogs and answers, and feeling rather low about not doing those working boxes, following those magnificent schedules, and not having girls who are ‘reading at two years of age at a college level’, or who can do math lessons like eating hot pancakes, I decided to do one more humble try at presenting my oldest with the McGuffey primer readers. I noticed though that there is a truth to the modern early readers full of pictures. My daughter too will try to guess the word instead of reading it, and it discourages the phonic training so instead of focusing on reading the actual word, they go fast reading by guessing, memorizing, and using initial letter if anything. We did the first lesson, we need to repeat it, but it looks like she is happy with how short it is. I don’t want to force her or push her, but I believe if I keep it short she’ll do good with this type of truly phonetic instruction.
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